Prize Paper Award 2015

 

We are pleased to announce the following article as the winner of the inaugural Particle and Fibre Toxicology Prize Paper Award. Selected from all those published in 2015, the winning paper was determined by a panel of judges on our editorial board.

Advanced computational modeling for in vitro nanomaterial dosimetry

Glen M. DeLoid, Joel M. Cohen, Georgios Pyrgiotakis, Sandra V. Pirela, Anoop Pal, Jiying Liu, Jelena Srebric and Philip Demokritou

Aims and scope

Particle and Fibre Toxicology is a multi-disciplinary journal focused on understanding the physical properties and the chemistry of particles and fibres in relation to exposure in general and workplace environments and the resulting adverse human health effects (toxicity).

It is an open access, peer-reviewed journal functioning as a forum for debate and communication among toxicologists, as well as scientists from other disciplines that produce and develop particle and fibre materials, including material sciences, biomaterials and nanomedicine. In addition, there are diverse scenarios where particles may pose a toxicological threat due to new applications of old materials or introduction of new materials. Particle and Fibre Toxicology provides a single, identifiable outlet for all these disciplines.

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Editor-in-Chief

Flemming R. Cassee works at the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, the Netherlands and also has a position as professor in inhalation toxicology at the Institute of Risk Assessment Sciences of the University of Utrecht, the Netherlands. He has been active in toxicology for more than 20 years with a prime interest in the adverse health effects of air pollutants and inhaled nanomaterials.

"The impact of toxicology is highly variable. In air pollution, standards are mostly based on epidemiology, whereas at the workplace or for specific substances, regulations are directed by toxicological information. I think that it remains a challenge to interact with each other. We also need to communicate our findings to those who use them. This requires a different language."

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